Now I Am Awake

Tiny, transcendent pieces of rapture and magic from We Have Embarked's Zachary Goldberg.
The Look of Silence (2014) dir. Joshua Oppenheimer
How can we learn to forgive when those who have committed such atrocity, inflicted so much pain, and caused so much harm and trauma, cannot even begin to understand, and take responsibility for, the enormity of their cruel actions?
There may not be an answer.
But until then, at least we can reflect and hope, through our anguish, for a future metamorphosis and change of perspective.

The Look of Silence (2014) dir. Joshua Oppenheimer

How can we learn to forgive when those who have committed such atrocity, inflicted so much pain, and caused so much harm and trauma, cannot even begin to understand, and take responsibility for, the enormity of their cruel actions?

There may not be an answer.

But until then, at least we can reflect and hope, through our anguish, for a future metamorphosis and change of perspective.

Dark Passage (1947) dir. Delmer Davis

"You’re just too marvelous. Too marvelous for words."

Do The Right Thing (1989) dir. Spike Lee
"Mothafuck a window. Radio Raheem is dead."

Do The Right Thing (1989) dir. Spike Lee

"Mothafuck a window. Radio Raheem is dead."

The Wizard of Oz (1939) dir. Victor Flemming

75 years to the date since Dorothy went over the rainbow. Aren’t we the lucky ones?

Lauren Bacall (1924 - 2014)
She was the last of her kind. The last of the true movie stars. The last cowgirl. And boy, oh boy, was she just too marvelous for words.RIP Lauren Bacall. My favorite of the old Hollywood actresses. It was a wish of mine to one day meet her. To ask her about Bogie, about Hawks, about the Golden Age of Holllywood. About living through the first century of cinema.Hope you’re grabbing a drink with Bogart right now, Ms. Bacall.

Lauren Bacall (1924 - 2014)

She was the last of her kind. The last of the true movie stars. The last cowgirl. And boy, oh boy, was she just too marvelous for words.

RIP Lauren Bacall. My favorite of the old Hollywood actresses. It was a wish of mine to one day meet her. To ask her about Bogie, about Hawks, about the Golden Age of Holllywood. About living through the first century of cinema.

Hope you’re grabbing a drink with Bogart right now, Ms. Bacall.

"You know that place between sleep and awake? That place where you still remember dreaming? That’s where I’ll always love you… That’s where I’ll be waiting." - RIP Robin.

"You know that place between sleep and awake? That place where you still remember dreaming? That’s where I’ll always love you… That’s where I’ll be waiting." - RIP Robin.

A Mechanical Eye

Man with a Movie Camera (1929) dir. Dziga Vertov

“I’m an eye. A mechanical eye. I, the machine, show you a world the way only I can see it. I free myself for today and forever from human immobility. I’m in constant movement. I approach and pull away from objects. I creep under them. I move alongside a running horse’s mouth. I fall and rise with the falling and rising bodies. This is I, the machine, manoeuvring in the chaotic movements, recording one movement after another in the most complex combinations. Freed from the boundaries of time and space, I co-ordinate any and all points of the universe, wherever I want them to be. My way leads towards the creation of a fresh perception of the world. Thus I explain in a new way the world unknown to you.”Dziga Vertov

Watch the mesmerizing “Man with a Movie Camera.”

"We have many names for what we do – cinema, movies, motion pictures. And…film. We’re called directors, but more often we’re called filmmakers. Filmmakers. I’m not suggesting that we ignore the obvious: HD isn’t coming, it’s here. The advantages are numerous: the cameras are lighter, it’s much easier to shoot at night, we have many more means at our disposal for altering and perfecting our images. And, the cameras are more affordable: films really can be made now for very little money. Even those of us still shooting on film finish in HD, and our movies are projected in HD. So, we could easily agree that the future is here, that film is cumbersome and imperfect and difficult to transport and prone to wear and decay, and that it’s time to forget the past and say goodbye – really, that could be easily done. Too easily.
 
It seems like we’re always being reminded that film is, after all, a business. But film is also an art form, and young people who are driven to make films should have access to the tools and materials that were the building blocks of that art form. Would anyone dream of telling young artists to throw away their paints and canvases because iPads are so much easier to carry? Of course not. In the history of motion pictures, only a minuscule percentage of the works comprising our art form was not shot on film. Everything we do in HD is an effort to recreate the look of film. Film, even now, offers a richer visual palette than HD. And, we have to remember that film is still the best and only time-proven way to preserve movies. We have no assurance that digital informaton will last, but we know that film will, if properly stored and cared for.
 
Our industry – our filmmakers – rallied behind Kodak because we knew that we couldn’t afford to lose them, the way we’ve lost so many other film stocks. This news is a positive step towards preserving film, the art form we love.” - Master Martin Scorsese on the production and preservation of film stock
"We have many names for what we do – cinema, movies, motion pictures. And…film. We’re called directors, but more often we’re called filmmakers. Filmmakers. I’m not suggesting that we ignore the obvious: HD isn’t coming, it’s here. The advantages are numerous: the cameras are lighter, it’s much easier to shoot at night, we have many more means at our disposal for altering and perfecting our images. And, the cameras are more affordable: films really can be made now for very little money. Even those of us still shooting on film finish in HD, and our movies are projected in HD. So, we could easily agree that the future is here, that film is cumbersome and imperfect and difficult to transport and prone to wear and decay, and that it’s time to forget the past and say goodbye – really, that could be easily done. Too easily.
 
It seems like we’re always being reminded that film is, after all, a business. But film is also an art form, and young people who are driven to make films should have access to the tools and materials that were the building blocks of that art form. Would anyone dream of telling young artists to throw away their paints and canvases because iPads are so much easier to carry? Of course not. In the history of motion pictures, only a minuscule percentage of the works comprising our art form was not shot on film. Everything we do in HD is an effort to recreate the look of film. Film, even now, offers a richer visual palette than HD. And, we have to remember that film is still the best and only time-proven way to preserve movies. We have no assurance that digital informaton will last, but we know that film will, if properly stored and cared for.
 
Our industry – our filmmakers – rallied behind Kodak because we knew that we couldn’t afford to lose them, the way we’ve lost so many other film stocks. This news is a positive step towards preserving film, the art form we love.” - Master Martin Scorsese on the production and preservation of film stock
The Shining (1980) dir. Stanley Kubrick
"All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy."

The Shining (1980) dir. Stanley Kubrick

"All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy."

What’s Up, Doc? (1972) dir. Peter Bogdanovich

"What’s wrong?" "The future." "What’s the matter with it?"